NEW POLL: Reality of separation turns Scots off

People in Scotland are far less likely to support leaving the UK if public spending is cut, a hard border is introduced with England, or the pound is replaced with the euro, a new poll has revealed.


With independent government figures showing that a separate Scotland would require huge spending cuts to reduce its deficit, more than half of those polled by Survation (52%) said they would be less likely to vote to leave the UK if they thought this would happen.

Asked about the pound being replaced with the euro – which all new EU member states are required to commit to – 45% said they would be less likely to back independence.

And 41% said the same if a hard border was to be introduced between Scotland and England, which experts have said would be necessary if an independent Scotland rejoined the EU.

The findings also revealed that more than half of voters (53%) would be less likely to back leaving the UK if their own personal income was reduced, and 48% said the same if taxes were increased.

The Survation poll was carried out for Scotland in Union, conducted online among residents aged 16+ living in Scotland between November 18 and 22, with a sample size of 1,045.


It found that 54% of people in Scotland are against another referendum within the next two years, and 59% are in favour of remaining part of the UK.

Pamela Nash, chief executive of Scotland in Union, said:


“The reality of leaving the UK is clear – cuts to our schools and hospitals to reduce the deficit, scrapping the pound, and building a hard border with our closest friends and neighbours.


“When this reality is presented to the people of Scotland, it’s no wonder that even fewer people back the SNP’s negative and inward-looking campaign for separation.


“A growing majority of people in Scotland want to remain part of the UK, ensuring a positive future where we bring people together, look outwards to our friends and neighbours, and leave no community behind.”